Sunday, 14 May 2017

Promoting the arts



A joint venture! Market Harborough Art Club (MHAC) and Harborough Artist Cluster (HAC) help each other.  Last weekend the HAC & MHAC took to the streets and the local market to advertise the HAC Open Studios and MHAC. 


Friday, 28 April 2017

March came and went!

A little painting done last month. A portrait of Libby and my entry into the Kettering open Exhibition,
'Fill this Space,' held at the Alfred East Art Gallery.

'Libby'



Catkins and Courtship Oil 30 x 40 cm painted on wooden panel



The first prize winner was a water colour called 'Prickly Customer,' by Gill Denbigh.

Prickly Customer

The work was behind glass so the photograph does not not it justice.

The exhibition closes on 20th May 2017.


















Saturday, 22 April 2017

Little Selves Exhibition

If you haven’t been to see the ‘Little Selves Exhibition’ in the New Walk Museum Leicester, there is still plenty of time. It closes on the 25th June 2017. It features a portrait by one of our members - Eden Coe. It is well worth a visit, not only to see Eden’s work in reality, but to view other students work, LSA artists and guests like Paul Wright. 

Eden’s work - ‘Idris’ Acrylic

Sunday, 26 February 2017

Surprise photographs



Many thanks to Michael Edwards for leading this fun and useful evening session. The serious side of this activity was to help MHAC members and visitors loosen up their style of painting. Most worked in water colour, but you can also use other mediums.












The Technique

Place a number of photographs on a table so that they face downwards.

Use a mount to draw a rectangle on the painting surface. It should be the same size as the photograph (6 x 4 inches, 15 x 10 cm).

Select a photograph and put it upside down on the easle. Time 15 minutes.

Disassociate the brain by spending 10 minutes on concentrating on putting in ‘the shapes.’

In the last 5 minutes put the photograph the right side up and apply the details to the painting.




Amazing pictures and done in 15 minutes! Now I can understand how you can do a daily painting.
















Friday, 27 January 2017

An Evening with Robert Lodge





In the words of Frank Sinatra; Robert, “I did it my way”. The examples of Robert’s paintings and drawings demonstrate his wide ranging skills in all media.The artists he admires  most are Van Gogh, Millet and for traditional painting Caravaggio.  Variety is definitely the key word for this evening.





When painting plein air Robert would use a view finder to scan the landscape until he settled  upon an inspirational view. He would even place the view finder on a cane and refer to it for the first 30 minutes. Once the view was found he would take a photograph, before the light and weather changed. Next comes the sketch, followed by the painting. As a rule he would only work outside for about an hour and a half. The painting would then be completed in the studio.







For this evening a pencil sketch of farm buildings in a landscape was transfered in plum coloured acrylic on an indigo coloured canvas board. As the painting progressed he used his visual memory to develop the painting. He recommended novices to use the cheapest paints although he did admit you can tell the difference in finish between student and artist quality paints. Most of the brushes used were long synthetic flats. He didn’t use a flow improver, and built up layers with thin paint. An old plate was his palette. Using a  hog pro art one and half inch brush, he painted the sky in cobalt blue. The order of work was background, middle ground and foreground: working dark to light. The details left to the last. Darks placed next to lights,  warm colours were contrasted with cool colours, fingers and thumbs were used to create smooth passages of paint, dry brush technique applied to allow the under colours to glow through. Twisting the paint provided some interesting shapes and textures. A tissue smoothed gently over the surface created some soft edges. Impressionists do not use black, but on this occasion Robert used black mixed with blue to get an indigo colour. It was a surprise to see him use ‘flesh colour’ in a landscape.Robert chose to work in an impressionist style because  it is quick, and he certainly worked quick, a complete painting from start to finish in one and a hours!




















Friday, 9 December 2016

The magic of Jane french

Jane French's painting of her son
At our last meeting, we were fortunate enough to have gifted artist Jane French give us a demonstration in portraiture using oils. Her source photo was that of her son, some years earlier. Starting with just a faint pencil sketch on canvas, Jane set about applying mid tones of paint first, working her way around the face in careful, deliberate strokes using a chisel edged brush for most of the time. A thinner brush was used only to pick out finer detail at the end.

A final dash of white for highlight to the eye and lower lip had the effect of making the painting come alive, even at this early stage of development. Most of us could detect magenta and yellow in the face in the photograph, but we were amazed at how Jane could see blue and grey, which worked perfectly once we saw it applied.


All in all, a lovely evenings entertainment, and much food for thought in respect of our own prospective paintings.

Monday, 31 October 2016

Great Achievement for our Members

June pond - Jane Palmer
Last weekend several of our members entered work in the Great Bowden Visual Arts exhibition. This event has been held each year in the village hall since 2007 and is well attended, often selling a number of works of art.

This year, four of our members sold six out of a total of eight paintings sold, which is quite an achievement and shows just how much talent we have amongst us.

Here is a selection of some of the works that sold:

Leicestershire Landscape - Jane Palmer

The Rooster - Frank Bingley

Ewe - Frank Bingley








Other members successful in selling work were Michael Edwards and David Coleman.